A tiny introduction of a long-standing Erlang fan

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A tiny introduction of a long-standing Erlang fan

Giovanni Giorgi

Hi everybody,
 my name is Giovanni Giorgi and I am a 46 years old DevOps Solution Architect, mostly in Java.

I work as a professional software engineer from 2000 after a PhD on Information Technology at University of Milan, Italy.

I discovered Erlang in 2009, I have read "Erlang Programming A Concurrent Approach to Software Development" by Francesco Cesarini & Simon Thompson and I liked it.

I also have the lucky to make an interview to Francesco in 2014. 

I have done very little projects years ago (https://github.com/daitangio/er_zauker) , but I'd like to make a "refresh" of my knowledge, because I learned up to release 17 (on 2014...about 7 years ago).

I have some trouble finding out tutorials and books on latest Erlang features, and I am collecting articles and tutorials (like the nice https://blog.erlang.org/the-road-to-the-jit/  and the addendum on Maps  by https://learnyousomeerlang.com/maps#about-this-chapter  ); so I decide to subscribe again to the mailing list for collecting new tutorial, idioms and trends.

So I hope to have your support to take a second look at Erlang.


PS: I have studied a bit Elixir but I prefer Erlang language right now.

--
Giovanni Giorgi via webmail
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Re: A tiny introduction of a long-standing Erlang fan

zxq9-2
Hi Giovanni!

On 2021/04/07 18:29, Giovanni Giorgi wrote:
> I have some trouble finding out tutorials and books on latest Erlang
> features, and I am collecting articles and tutorials (like the nice
> https://blog.erlang.org/the-road-to-the-jit/  and the addendum on Maps  
> by https://learnyousomeerlang.com/maps#about-this-chapter  ); so I
> decide to subscribe again to the mailing list for collecting new
> tutorial, idioms and trends.

Lately I've been making a few tutorial videos to address some
fundamentals and practical code examples in projects that run with repos
you can explore and hack on.

Network services: Telnet chat server
A two-part example of a multiuser network application in its minimal
stages to show how such a thing can work first as a broadcast/echo
service and then with channels, usernames, and a limited permission
system that is small enough to understand the components of with a
minimal of code reading.

Here is a blog post with both videos linked and an explanation of each.
https://zxq9.com/archives/1872


GUI coding: Tetris in Erlang
This was a lot of fun, but took a bit of time to explain exhaustively so
it turned into a 3-video series. I make sure to talk through the commit
history so you can play with each commit stage locally and understand
the diffs without too much exploration.

Part 1: Data Types and Basic GUI Display
https://zxq9.com/archives/1882

Part 2: Gameplay Mechanics
https://zxq9.com/archives/1886

Part 3: Gameplay Rules, Final Features and Deployment
https://zxq9.com/archives/1894


A discussion about conditional idioms using Fizzbuzz as a simple
example, comparing Python and Erlang:
https://zxq9.com/archives/1877


A discussion about what OOP style objects are with an example
implementation in Erlang:
https://zxq9.com/archives/1838


There is some other stuff as well, but you are the target audience for
these so I figured I'd link them here as some others have found them
helpful. I really need to do a "wxErlang from the ground up" sort of
video but haven't decided a good way to structure that just yet. A
little informal group of other coders and I are considering expanding
the chat example service with a GUI client with some extra feature
extensions (like launching multiplayer games, communal whiteboard, image
chat, etc.) as an example and a plugin playground newcomers can play
with and study for ideas but we haven't found the time just yet.

-Craig