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Famous threads?

Yestin L. Harrison
I'm still relatively green to all this Erlang business. Considering that this
list's first message predates my birth by a few months, and seeing references
to threads everywhere from recordings of Erlang talks to StackOverflow answers,
I was wondering if anyone could name any sort of "required reading" as it
concerns design philosophy, shared culture, programming style, unspoken
guidelines, heuristics, or anything else under the sun, that may only be
obvious to relative veterans of this list. For instance, Garrett Smith's "Why
the Cool Kids Don't Use Erlang" (2014) mentions the then-recent "bikeshed
thread" that was apparently notorious enough to warrant a survey, and I can't
for the life of me dig that out of the archive. If I can compile a list of
such things, I may well be able to upload that somewhere for others' future
reference.
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Re: Famous threads?

Brujo Benavides-3
Hi Yestin,

You can start with the links and references from http://spawnedshelter.com/

Cheers!

On Tue, May 28, 2019 at 10:36 AM Yestin L. Harrison <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm still relatively green to all this Erlang business. Considering that this
list's first message predates my birth by a few months, and seeing references
to threads everywhere from recordings of Erlang talks to StackOverflow answers,
I was wondering if anyone could name any sort of "required reading" as it
concerns design philosophy, shared culture, programming style, unspoken
guidelines, heuristics, or anything else under the sun, that may only be
obvious to relative veterans of this list. For instance, Garrett Smith's "Why
the Cool Kids Don't Use Erlang" (2014) mentions the then-recent "bikeshed
thread" that was apparently notorious enough to warrant a survey, and I can't
for the life of me dig that out of the archive. If I can compile a list of
such things, I may well be able to upload that somewhere for others' future
reference.
_______________________________________________
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[hidden email]
http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions


--
Brujo Benavides
about.me/elbrujohalcon

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Re: Famous threads?

Grzegorz Junka

Wow, @Brujo, that's an excellent resource. Thanks for sharing!

@yestin, the list is quite long, so to start somewhere I would recommend the very beginning, which would be Joe's PhD's thesis

http://erlang.org/download/armstrong_thesis_2003.pdf (the link 8. in the Introduction, which should host the same document, doesn't seem to work).

This gives a high-level view of the overall design principles. After that if you like verbose and explanatory writing then Learn you some Erlang book is pretty good, albeit quite long. Otherwise Erlang and OTP in Action is very good https://www.manning.com/books/erlang-and-otp-in-action

GrzegorzJ


On 28/05/2019 13:41, Brujo Benavides wrote:
Hi Yestin,

You can start with the links and references from http://spawnedshelter.com/

Cheers!

On Tue, May 28, 2019 at 10:36 AM Yestin L. Harrison <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm still relatively green to all this Erlang business. Considering that this
list's first message predates my birth by a few months, and seeing references
to threads everywhere from recordings of Erlang talks to StackOverflow answers,
I was wondering if anyone could name any sort of "required reading" as it
concerns design philosophy, shared culture, programming style, unspoken
guidelines, heuristics, or anything else under the sun, that may only be
obvious to relative veterans of this list. For instance, Garrett Smith's "Why
the Cool Kids Don't Use Erlang" (2014) mentions the then-recent "bikeshed
thread" that was apparently notorious enough to warrant a survey, and I can't
for the life of me dig that out of the archive. If I can compile a list of
such things, I may well be able to upload that somewhere for others' future
reference.
_______________________________________________
erlang-questions mailing list
[hidden email]
http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions


--
Brujo Benavides
about.me/elbrujohalcon

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[hidden email]
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Re: Famous threads?

Juan Martín Guillén
In reply to this post by Brujo Benavides-3
The one Brujo is mentioning is great, I did't know about it.

I would add Learn You Some Erlang: https://learnyousomeerlang.com/

And of course for the people of your generation the audiovisual and acclaimed "Erlang: The Movie": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uKfKtXYLG78


Regards,
Juan Martín.




El martes, 28 de mayo de 2019 10:42:19 ART, Brujo Benavides <[hidden email]> escribió:


Hi Yestin,

You can start with the links and references from http://spawnedshelter.com/

Cheers!

On Tue, May 28, 2019 at 10:36 AM Yestin L. Harrison <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm still relatively green to all this Erlang business. Considering that this
list's first message predates my birth by a few months, and seeing references
to threads everywhere from recordings of Erlang talks to StackOverflow answers,
I was wondering if anyone could name any sort of "required reading" as it
concerns design philosophy, shared culture, programming style, unspoken
guidelines, heuristics, or anything else under the sun, that may only be
obvious to relative veterans of this list. For instance, Garrett Smith's "Why
the Cool Kids Don't Use Erlang" (2014) mentions the then-recent "bikeshed
thread" that was apparently notorious enough to warrant a survey, and I can't
for the life of me dig that out of the archive. If I can compile a list of
such things, I may well be able to upload that somewhere for others' future
reference.
_______________________________________________
erlang-questions mailing list
[hidden email]
http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions


--
Brujo Benavides
about.me/elbrujohalcon
_______________________________________________
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[hidden email]
http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions

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Re: Famous threads?

Lloyd R. Prentice-2
In reply to this post by Brujo Benavides-3
What an outstanding resource!

Thank you, Bruno.

Best wishes,

LRP

Sent from my iPad

On May 28, 2019, at 9:41 AM, Brujo Benavides <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Yestin,

You can start with the links and references from http://spawnedshelter.com/

Cheers!

On Tue, May 28, 2019 at 10:36 AM Yestin L. Harrison <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm still relatively green to all this Erlang business. Considering that this
list's first message predates my birth by a few months, and seeing references
to threads everywhere from recordings of Erlang talks to StackOverflow answers,
I was wondering if anyone could name any sort of "required reading" as it
concerns design philosophy, shared culture, programming style, unspoken
guidelines, heuristics, or anything else under the sun, that may only be
obvious to relative veterans of this list. For instance, Garrett Smith's "Why
the Cool Kids Don't Use Erlang" (2014) mentions the then-recent "bikeshed
thread" that was apparently notorious enough to warrant a survey, and I can't
for the life of me dig that out of the archive. If I can compile a list of
such things, I may well be able to upload that somewhere for others' future
reference.
_______________________________________________
erlang-questions mailing list
[hidden email]
http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions


--
Brujo Benavides
about.me/elbrujohalcon
_______________________________________________
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[hidden email]
http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions

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Re: Famous threads?

Ola Andersson A (AL/EAB)
In reply to this post by Brujo Benavides-3

This is a goldmine!

Thank you so much Brujo.

/Ola.

 

 

From: [hidden email] <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of Brujo Benavides
Sent: den 28 maj 2019 15:42
To: Yestin L. Harrison <[hidden email]>
Cc: erlang-questions <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [erlang-questions] Famous threads?

 

Hi Yestin,

 

You can start with the links and references from http://spawnedshelter.com/

 

Cheers!

 

On Tue, May 28, 2019 at 10:36 AM Yestin L. Harrison <[hidden email]> wrote:

I'm still relatively green to all this Erlang business. Considering that this
list's first message predates my birth by a few months, and seeing references
to threads everywhere from recordings of Erlang talks to StackOverflow answers,
I was wondering if anyone could name any sort of "required reading" as it
concerns design philosophy, shared culture, programming style, unspoken
guidelines, heuristics, or anything else under the sun, that may only be
obvious to relative veterans of this list. For instance, Garrett Smith's "Why
the Cool Kids Don't Use Erlang" (2014) mentions the then-recent "bikeshed
thread" that was apparently notorious enough to warrant a survey, and I can't
for the life of me dig that out of the archive. If I can compile a list of
such things, I may well be able to upload that somewhere for others' future
reference.
_______________________________________________
erlang-questions mailing list
[hidden email]
http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions


 

--

Brujo Benavides

about.me/elbrujohalcon

 


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Re: Famous threads?

Richard O'Keefe
In reply to this post by Brujo Benavides-3
spawnedshelter.com is just WONDERFUL.  How did I miss it?
I've been following Erlang for longer than I care to admit,
and there's information there that I still needed to know.
Brilliant!

On Wed, 29 May 2019 at 01:42, Brujo Benavides <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Yestin,

You can start with the links and references from http://spawnedshelter.com/

Cheers!

On Tue, May 28, 2019 at 10:36 AM Yestin L. Harrison <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm still relatively green to all this Erlang business. Considering that this
list's first message predates my birth by a few months, and seeing references
to threads everywhere from recordings of Erlang talks to StackOverflow answers,
I was wondering if anyone could name any sort of "required reading" as it
concerns design philosophy, shared culture, programming style, unspoken
guidelines, heuristics, or anything else under the sun, that may only be
obvious to relative veterans of this list. For instance, Garrett Smith's "Why
the Cool Kids Don't Use Erlang" (2014) mentions the then-recent "bikeshed
thread" that was apparently notorious enough to warrant a survey, and I can't
for the life of me dig that out of the archive. If I can compile a list of
such things, I may well be able to upload that somewhere for others' future
reference.
_______________________________________________
erlang-questions mailing list
[hidden email]
http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions


--
Brujo Benavides
about.me/elbrujohalcon
_______________________________________________
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[hidden email]
http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions

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Re: Famous threads?

Bob Ippolito
Likewise! This is a great resource, would be fantastic to have it linked to from Erlang.org and elsewhere :)

On Tue, May 28, 2019 at 19:28 Richard O'Keefe <[hidden email]> wrote:
spawnedshelter.com is just WONDERFUL.  How did I miss it?
I've been following Erlang for longer than I care to admit,
and there's information there that I still needed to know.
Brilliant!

On Wed, 29 May 2019 at 01:42, Brujo Benavides <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Yestin,

You can start with the links and references from http://spawnedshelter.com/

Cheers!

On Tue, May 28, 2019 at 10:36 AM Yestin L. Harrison <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm still relatively green to all this Erlang business. Considering that this
list's first message predates my birth by a few months, and seeing references
to threads everywhere from recordings of Erlang talks to StackOverflow answers,
I was wondering if anyone could name any sort of "required reading" as it
concerns design philosophy, shared culture, programming style, unspoken
guidelines, heuristics, or anything else under the sun, that may only be
obvious to relative veterans of this list. For instance, Garrett Smith's "Why
the Cool Kids Don't Use Erlang" (2014) mentions the then-recent "bikeshed
thread" that was apparently notorious enough to warrant a survey, and I can't
for the life of me dig that out of the archive. If I can compile a list of
such things, I may well be able to upload that somewhere for others' future
reference.
_______________________________________________
erlang-questions mailing list
[hidden email]
http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions


--
Brujo Benavides
about.me/elbrujohalcon
_______________________________________________
erlang-questions mailing list
[hidden email]
http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions
_______________________________________________
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[hidden email]
http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions

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Re: Famous threads?

Yestin L. Harrison
In reply to this post by Juan Martín Guillén
Thank you, all; I appreciate the sentiment. There are definitely some
links on this Spawned Shelter page that weren't already in my bookmarks.
:) Perhaps, though, I should clarify just how "relative" "relatively
green" was supposed to mean: I'm two years and three main projects deep,
and know how to operate a search engine; it's just that I haven't yet
judged myself fit to "break into the industry", nor have I participated
awfully much in the broader Erlang community. The most informative talks
I've seen, by and large, come from 2009-2014, and my picture of where
things stand gets progressively hazier after that. The sorts of
questions I still end up having are: "Should I bother  maintaining a
makefile for libraries I intend to release or does everyone just  use
rebar3 now?", "If I'm writing a source-to-source compiler for a well-
established DSL in the vein of `asn1ct` or `snmpc`, should I take pains
to stay as consistent as possible with the various modules listed in
`erl_compile`?", or "What sense do I make of all these undocumented yet
invaluable functions like io:request/2”? I'm currently /specifically/
curious  as to whether there are insights or bits of history hiding in
the  erlang-questions archive in particular, snapshots of the zeitgeist,
lesser-known aphorisms from the creators, that sort of thing. I'm
looking to develop my personal almanac of the Erlang ecosystem and
community, as it were, so I can stop feeling that no matter how much
reference material I pore over I'm still on the outside looking in, at
least as it regards how other Erlang programmers actually operate today.

I hope that makes sense; I understand what I'm ultimately asking is
somewhat vague.

On 5/28/19 07:17, Juan Martín Guillén wrote:

> The one Brujo is mentioning is great, I did't know about it.
>
> I would add Learn You Some Erlang: https://learnyousomeerlang.com/
>
> And of course for the people of your generation the audiovisual and
> acclaimed "Erlang: The Movie": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uKfKtXYLG78
>
> And the sequel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rRbY3TMUcgQ
>
> Regards,
> Juan Martín.
>
>
>
>
> El martes, 28 de mayo de 2019 10:42:19 ART, Brujo Benavides
> <[hidden email]> escribió:
>
>
> Hi Yestin,
>
> You can start with the links and references from http://spawnedshelter.com/
>
> Cheers!
>
> On Tue, May 28, 2019 at 10:36 AM Yestin L. Harrison <[hidden email]
> <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>     I'm still relatively green to all this Erlang business. Considering
>     that this
>     list's first message predates my birth by a few months, and seeing
>     references
>     to threads everywhere from recordings of Erlang talks to
>     StackOverflow answers,
>     I was wondering if anyone could name any sort of "required reading"
>     as it
>     concerns design philosophy, shared culture, programming style, unspoken
>     guidelines, heuristics, or anything else under the sun, that may only be
>     obvious to relative veterans of this list. For instance, Garrett
>     Smith's "Why
>     the Cool Kids Don't Use Erlang" (2014) mentions the then-recent
>     "bikeshed
>     thread" that was apparently notorious enough to warrant a survey,
>     and I can't
>     for the life of me dig that out of the archive. If I can compile a
>     list of
>     such things, I may well be able to upload that somewhere for others'
>     future
>     reference.
>     _______________________________________________
>     erlang-questions mailing list
>     [hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>
>     http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions
>
>
>
> --
> <https://about.me/elbrujohalcon?promo=email_sig&utm_source=product&utm_medium=email_sig&utm_campaign=gmail_api&utm_content=thumb>
>
> Brujo Benavides
> about.me/elbrujohalcon
> <https://about.me/elbrujohalcon?promo=email_sig&utm_source=product&utm_medium=email_sig&utm_campaign=gmail_api&utm_content=thumb>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> erlang-questions mailing list
> [hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>
> http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions
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