Is concurrency hard?

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Is concurrency hard?

Joe Armstrong (AL/EAB)

> From: Mats Cronqvist [mailto:mats.cronqvist]
>
> Joe Armstrong (AL/EAB) wrote:
> > I'm a physicist (or at least I was - a long time ago)
> >
> > ...
>
>    joe must be older than he seems since the aether theory
> was discounted nearly
> 100 years ago... from wikipedia->Luminiferous_aether:
>
> In the late 19th century the luminiferous aether
> ("light-bearing aether"), or
> ether, was a substance
> postulated to be the medium for the propagation of light.
> Later theories,
> including Einstein's
> Theory of Relativity, suggested that an aether did not have
> to exist, and today
> the concept is considered "quaint".

If Mats had read a little bit further
under "Modern physics & the Aether" he would have found that
aether theories still abound - ... - it's that warm green
sticky stuff that glues everyuthing together

/Joe




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Is concurrency hard?

Mats Cronqvist (ÄL2/EAB)


Joe Armstrong (AL/EAB) wrote:
> If Mats had read a little bit further
> under "Modern physics & the Aether" he would have found that
> aether theories still abound - ... - it's that warm green
> sticky stuff that glues everyuthing together

   the ability to ignore facts that disagrees with my preconcieved notions seems
to be a requirement in my current line of work...
   otoh, Albert Einstein is probably more famous than e.g. Grote Reber for a reason.

   mats


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Is concurrency hard?

Marc van Woerkom-2
>to be a requirement in my current line of work...
>   otoh, Albert Einstein is probably more famous than
>e.g. Grote Reber for a reason.

That old mechanical concept is dead.

More interesting is the fact that the vacuum thanks to
Heisenberg is not empty, for short times dt such a large
energy fluctuation dE is possible that is enough to create
particle antiparticle pairs.

The world seems to be very strange at the bottom.

Regards,
Marc


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Is concurrency hard?

Ulf Wiger-5
In reply to this post by Mats Cronqvist (ÄL2/EAB)
Den 2005-11-02 14:34:25 skrev Mats Cronqvist <mats.cronqvist>:

>    otoh, Albert Einstein is probably more famous than e.g. Grote Reber  
> for a reason.

To clarify, Grote Reber was quite a pioneer (extremely off-topic,
but a piece of fun history nonetheless):

"Mr. Reber was the first person to build a radio telescope dedicated
to astronomy, opening a window on the universe that eventually produced
such landmark discoveries as quasars, pulsars and the remnant afterglow
of the big bang"

"'Radio astronomy has changed profoundly our understanding of the  
universe,'
[Fred Lo] said in the statement. 'All radio astronomers who have followed
him owe Grote Reber a deep debt for his pioneering work.'

"Lo said that Mr. Reber 'was the first to systematically study the sky by
observing something other than visible light. This gave astronomy a whole
new view of the universe.'"

(http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn?pagename=article&contentId=A38383-2002Dec25&notFound=true)

"Though not a professional scientist, his research results were published
in a number of prestigious technical journals, including Nature, the
Astrophysical Journal, the Proceedings of the Institute of Radio Engineers
and the Journal of Geophysical Research.

"Reber also received a number of honors normally reserved for scientists
professionally trained in astronomy, including the American Astronomical
Society's Henry Norris Russell Lectureship and the Astronomical Society
of the Pacific's Bruce Medal in 1962, the National Radio Astronomy
Observatory's Jansky Lectureship in 1975, and the Royal Astronomical
Society's Jackson-Gwilt Medal in 1983."
(http://www.nrao.edu/pr/2002/reber/)

I guess it's difficult to compare him with Einstein, but the man
was certainly no slouch. (:

/Uffe
--
Ulf Wiger


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Is concurrency hard?

Garry Hodgson-3
In reply to this post by Joe Armstrong (AL/EAB)
"Joe Armstrong (AL/EAB)" <joe.armstrong> wrote:

> If Mats had read a little bit further
> under "Modern physics & the Aether" he would have found that
> aether theories still abound - ... - it's that warm green
> sticky stuff that glues everyuthing together

i thought that was duct tape?
oh, wait...that's grey.

----
Garry Hodgson, Technical Consultant, AT&T Labs

Your love, your anger, your kindness, your hate.
All of it creates the future for you and your children.
What kind of future are you creating today?