architectural/design overview of Erlang/OTP network stack

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architectural/design overview of Erlang/OTP network stack

Miles Fidelman
I wonder if someone can point me to any architectural/design
documentation of Erlang's network stack.

I'm interested in seeing how things are coded in Erlang, as opposed to c
implementation (to the extent that Erlang is not making use of underling
operating system network code).  I'm assuming that network programming
in Erlang lends itself to a different style than network coding in other
languages (I'm guessing some kinds of packets/transactions are handled
by spawning a process as opposed to creating and linking a buffer.)  
Sort of trying to get a feel for how this all works.

It would be cool beyond belief if someone has an overview of "the life
of an http transaction," or some such, that illustrates all the moving
parts, how events and data flow through various modules, and so forth.  
Failing that, some pointers into the code.

Thanks very much,

Miles Fidelman

--
In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice.
In practice, there is.   .... Yogi Berra

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Re: architectural/design overview of Erlang/OTP network stack

dmkolesnikov
Hello,

I would recommend you to look into design (source code) of following OTP applications
 * ssl
 * ssh

I would say that they reflect a “typical” scenario of network programming using Erlang.

Best Regards,
Dmitry


On 23 Jul 2014, at 23:02, Miles Fidelman <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I wonder if someone can point me to any architectural/design documentation of Erlang's network stack.
>
> I'm interested in seeing how things are coded in Erlang, as opposed to c implementation (to the extent that Erlang is not making use of underling operating system network code).  I'm assuming that network programming in Erlang lends itself to a different style than network coding in other languages (I'm guessing some kinds of packets/transactions are handled by spawning a process as opposed to creating and linking a buffer.)  Sort of trying to get a feel for how this all works.
>
> It would be cool beyond belief if someone has an overview of "the life of an http transaction," or some such, that illustrates all the moving parts, how events and data flow through various modules, and so forth.  Failing that, some pointers into the code.
>
> Thanks very much,
>
> Miles Fidelman
>
> --
> In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice.
> In practice, there is.   .... Yogi Berra
>
> _______________________________________________
> erlang-questions mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions

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Re: architectural/design overview of Erlang/OTP network stack

Miles Fidelman
Thanks!

Dmitry Kolesnikov wrote:

> Hello,
>
> I would recommend you to look into design (source code) of following OTP applications
>   * ssl
>   * ssh
>
> I would say that they reflect a “typical” scenario of network programming using Erlang.
>
> Best Regards,
> Dmitry
>
>
> On 23 Jul 2014, at 23:02, Miles Fidelman <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> I wonder if someone can point me to any architectural/design documentation of Erlang's network stack.
>>
>> I'm interested in seeing how things are coded in Erlang, as opposed to c implementation (to the extent that Erlang is not making use of underling operating system network code).  I'm assuming that network programming in Erlang lends itself to a different style than network coding in other languages (I'm guessing some kinds of packets/transactions are handled by spawning a process as opposed to creating and linking a buffer.)  Sort of trying to get a feel for how this all works.
>>
>> It would be cool beyond belief if someone has an overview of "the life of an http transaction," or some such, that illustrates all the moving parts, how events and data flow through various modules, and so forth.  Failing that, some pointers into the code.
>>
>> Thanks very much,
>>
>> Miles Fidelman
>>
>> --
>> In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice.
>> In practice, there is.   .... Yogi Berra
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> erlang-questions mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions


--
In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice.
In practice, there is.   .... Yogi Berra

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