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erlang 21

Sam Overdorf
Control-c does not get me out of the "erl" command line any more.
Why not?

Thanks,
Sam Overdorf
[hidden email]
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Re: erlang 21

Luke Bakken-2
Works on my Arch Linux workstation using a kerl-built Erlang 21.0.2
installation:

$ erl
Erlang/OTP 21 [erts-10.0.2] [source] [64-bit] [smp:8:8] [ds:8:8:10]
[async-threads:1] [hipe]

Eshell V10.0.2  (abort with ^G)
1>
BREAK: (a)bort (c)ontinue (p)roc info (i)nfo (l)oaded
       (v)ersion (k)ill (D)b-tables (d)istribution
^C(21.0.2)

I have to enter CTRL-C twice, but that's always been the case.

What exactly happens in your environment? Are you on Linux, Windows,
...??? What terminal are you using? How did you build or install
Erlang 21? That all seems like relevant information to provide.

On Fri, Jul 6, 2018 at 4:48 PM, Sam Overdorf <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Control-c does not get me out of the "erl" command line any more.
> Why not?
>
> Thanks,
> Sam Overdorf
> [hidden email]
> _______________________________________________
> erlang-questions mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions
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Re: erlang 21

Sam Overdorf
It basicly ignors the key strokes ^c^c.

I have to enter halt(). to get it to exit.

Thanks
Sam


On Fri, Jul 6, 2018 at 4:58 PM, Luke Bakken <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Works on my Arch Linux workstation using a kerl-built Erlang 21.0.2
> installation:
>
> $ erl
> Erlang/OTP 21 [erts-10.0.2] [source] [64-bit] [smp:8:8] [ds:8:8:10]
> [async-threads:1] [hipe]
>
> Eshell V10.0.2  (abort with ^G)
> 1>
> BREAK: (a)bort (c)ontinue (p)roc info (i)nfo (l)oaded
>        (v)ersion (k)ill (D)b-tables (d)istribution
> ^C(21.0.2)
>
> I have to enter CTRL-C twice, but that's always been the case.
>
> What exactly happens in your environment? Are you on Linux, Windows,
> ...??? What terminal are you using? How did you build or install
> Erlang 21? That all seems like relevant information to provide.
>
> On Fri, Jul 6, 2018 at 4:48 PM, Sam Overdorf <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> Control-c does not get me out of the "erl" command line any more.
>> Why not?
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Sam Overdorf
>> [hidden email]
>> _______________________________________________
>> erlang-questions mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions
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Re: erlang 21

José Valim-2
Sam, which operating system are you using? How was "erl" started? Are you using any special terminal/shell?

I have heard similar reports on Windows for Erlang/OTP 21.





José Valim
Skype: jv.ptec
Founder and Director of R&D

On Sat, Jul 7, 2018 at 2:05 AM, Sam Overdorf <[hidden email]> wrote:
It basicly ignors the key strokes ^c^c.

I have to enter halt(). to get it to exit.

Thanks
Sam


On Fri, Jul 6, 2018 at 4:58 PM, Luke Bakken <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Works on my Arch Linux workstation using a kerl-built Erlang 21.0.2
> installation:
>
> $ erl
> Erlang/OTP 21 [erts-10.0.2] [source] [64-bit] [smp:8:8] [ds:8:8:10]
> [async-threads:1] [hipe]
>
> Eshell V10.0.2  (abort with ^G)
> 1>
> BREAK: (a)bort (c)ontinue (p)roc info (i)nfo (l)oaded
>        (v)ersion (k)ill (D)b-tables (d)istribution
> ^C(21.0.2)
>
> I have to enter CTRL-C twice, but that's always been the case.
>
> What exactly happens in your environment? Are you on Linux, Windows,
> ...??? What terminal are you using? How did you build or install
> Erlang 21? That all seems like relevant information to provide.
>
> On Fri, Jul 6, 2018 at 4:48 PM, Sam Overdorf <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> Control-c does not get me out of the "erl" command line any more.
>> Why not?
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Sam Overdorf
>> [hidden email]
>> _______________________________________________
>> erlang-questions mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions
_______________________________________________
erlang-questions mailing list
[hidden email]
http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions


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Re: erlang 21

Alex Alvarez-4
Hitting CTRL-C twice on Erlang 21.0.2 running Linux kernel 4.14.53 works fine.  Also, didn't encounter any issue with either using CTRL-C and then selecting "a" for abort, or halt(). or q().  Might be a particular issue with your system shell.

Cheers,
Alex

On 07/07/2018 04:30 AM, José Valim wrote:
Sam, which operating system are you using? How was "erl" started? Are you using any special terminal/shell?

I have heard similar reports on Windows for Erlang/OTP 21.





José Valim
Skype: jv.ptec
Founder and Director of R&D

On Sat, Jul 7, 2018 at 2:05 AM, Sam Overdorf <[hidden email]> wrote:
It basicly ignors the key strokes ^c^c.

I have to enter halt(). to get it to exit.

Thanks
Sam


On Fri, Jul 6, 2018 at 4:58 PM, Luke Bakken <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Works on my Arch Linux workstation using a kerl-built Erlang 21.0.2
> installation:
>
> $ erl
> Erlang/OTP 21 [erts-10.0.2] [source] [64-bit] [smp:8:8] [ds:8:8:10]
> [async-threads:1] [hipe]
>
> Eshell V10.0.2  (abort with ^G)
> 1>
> BREAK: (a)bort (c)ontinue (p)roc info (i)nfo (l)oaded
>        (v)ersion (k)ill (D)b-tables (d)istribution
> ^C(21.0.2)
>
> I have to enter CTRL-C twice, but that's always been the case.
>
> What exactly happens in your environment? Are you on Linux, Windows,
> ...??? What terminal are you using? How did you build or install
> Erlang 21? That all seems like relevant information to provide.
>
> On Fri, Jul 6, 2018 at 4:48 PM, Sam Overdorf <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> Control-c does not get me out of the "erl" command line any more.
>> Why not?
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Sam Overdorf
>> [hidden email]
>> _______________________________________________
>> erlang-questions mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions
_______________________________________________
erlang-questions mailing list
[hidden email]
http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions



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Re: erlang 21

zxq9-2
A quick anecdote...

I and a lot of people on my team used to habitually halt() to exit.

Then one day someone abruptly shut down a remote node they were connected
to because, well, they had that habit.

^G is a safer habit to form and reminds you where you are at when you hit
it, whether connected to a remote node from a local erl shell (want 'q'),
or via SSH (want 'exit()').

-Craig
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Re: erlang 21

Dmytro Lytovchenko
I would say there is a clear usability flaw here. The shell should be smart enough to distinguish which command was typed (^G, ^C or q() or exit() or init:stop() or halt()) and whether there is a remote shell active. What it would do is to ask user what is his intent or somehow confirm that remote shell is active and REMOTE VM will now quit.

If the shell isn't that smart, there's a great improvement waiting to happen.

2018-07-07 12:59 GMT+02:00 <[hidden email]>:
A quick anecdote...

I and a lot of people on my team used to habitually halt() to exit.

Then one day someone abruptly shut down a remote node they were connected
to because, well, they had that habit.

^G is a safer habit to form and reminds you where you are at when you hit
it, whether connected to a remote node from a local erl shell (want 'q'),
or via SSH (want 'exit()').

-Craig
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[hidden email]
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Re: erlang 21

zxq9-2
Those usability improvements have already been made:

  ^G
Gets you to JCL mode. All Erlangers should be familiar with this. If you're
not, then read up on it and play around. Not much to learn.

  restricted shell
This is the real life saver: picking what commands are allowed to be run by
a user. This gives you a LOT more flexibility and than merely making things
like q() and exit() more special than they already are.

  customized shell over SSH
Even more freedom than a restricted shell definition. You can write some
really awesome remote tools this way (or an entire MUD interface...).
     

halt() and init:stop() are system calls and really shouldn't be the subject
of any human's habit-forming behaviors.

IMO this is a case of the humans ignoring the tools that have been made
available -- making similar things available under different names is not
likely to help.

-Craig


On 2018年7月7日土曜日 13時03分04秒 JST you wrote:

> I would say there is a clear usability flaw here. The shell should be smart
> enough to distinguish which command was typed (^G, ^C or q() or exit() or
> init:stop() or halt()) and whether there is a remote shell active. What it
> would do is to ask user what is his intent or somehow confirm that remote
> shell is active and REMOTE VM will now quit.
>
> If the shell isn't that smart, there's a great improvement waiting to
> happen.
>
> 2018-07-07 12:59 GMT+02:00 <[hidden email]>:
>
> > A quick anecdote...
> >
> > I and a lot of people on my team used to habitually halt() to exit.
> >
> > Then one day someone abruptly shut down a remote node they were connected
> > to because, well, they had that habit.
> >
> > ^G is a safer habit to form and reminds you where you are at when you hit
> > it, whether connected to a remote node from a local erl shell (want 'q'),
> > or via SSH (want 'exit()').
> >
> > -Craig
> > _______________________________________________
> > erlang-questions mailing list
> > [hidden email]
> > http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions
> >
>


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Re: erlang 21

zxq9-2
On 2018年7月7日土曜日 20時12分58秒 JST [hidden email] wrote:

> Those usability improvements have already been made:
>
>   ^G
> Gets you to JCL mode. All Erlangers should be familiar with this. If you're
> not, then read up on it and play around. Not much to learn.
>
>   restricted shell
> This is the real life saver: picking what commands are allowed to be run by
> a user. This gives you a LOT more flexibility and than merely making things
> like q() and exit() more special than they already are.
>
>   customized shell over SSH
> Even more freedom than a restricted shell definition. You can write some
> really awesome remote tools this way (or an entire MUD interface...).
>      
>
> halt() and init:stop() are system calls and really shouldn't be the subject
> of any human's habit-forming behaviors.
>
> IMO this is a case of the humans ignoring the tools that have been made
> available -- making similar things available under different names is not
> likely to help.

I hate to be the guy to sound preachy without providing a solution, so here
are links to the relevant parts of the docs for those who aren't sure where
to look to find all the magic.
(I remember the docs being a bit daunting when I returned to Erlang...)

Here are some useful spots to read up on and bookmark. Even if you don't
make much use of this stuff any time soon, knowing it is available tends to
lead to better results.

Erlang shell docs:
http://erlang.org/doc/man/shell.html

Shell docs section on JCL mode (you should be familiar with this):
http://erlang.org/doc/man/shell.html#jcl-mode

Section on restricted mode:
http://erlang.org/doc/man/shell.html#restricted-shell

The coolest thing ever -- defining your own shell commands and behavior:
http://erlang.org/doc/man/shell_default.html

SSH app (amazing things can be done with this):
http://erlang.org/doc/man/SSH_app.html

-Craig
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Re: erlang 21

Fred Youhanaie-2
In reply to this post by zxq9-2
I'll just add to all the good advice so far that "erl +Bi" will disable Ctrl-C.

That might be the source of Sam's issue.

Cheers,
Fred

On 07/07/18 12:12, [hidden email] wrote:

> Those usability improvements have already been made:
>
>    ^G
> Gets you to JCL mode. All Erlangers should be familiar with this. If you're
> not, then read up on it and play around. Not much to learn.
>
>    restricted shell
> This is the real life saver: picking what commands are allowed to be run by
> a user. This gives you a LOT more flexibility and than merely making things
> like q() and exit() more special than they already are.
>
>    customized shell over SSH
> Even more freedom than a restricted shell definition. You can write some
> really awesome remote tools this way (or an entire MUD interface...).
>        
>
> halt() and init:stop() are system calls and really shouldn't be the subject
> of any human's habit-forming behaviors.
>
> IMO this is a case of the humans ignoring the tools that have been made
> available -- making similar things available under different names is not
> likely to help.
>
> -Craig
>
>
> On 2018年7月7日土曜日 13時03分04秒 JST you wrote:
>> I would say there is a clear usability flaw here. The shell should be smart
>> enough to distinguish which command was typed (^G, ^C or q() or exit() or
>> init:stop() or halt()) and whether there is a remote shell active. What it
>> would do is to ask user what is his intent or somehow confirm that remote
>> shell is active and REMOTE VM will now quit.
>>
>> If the shell isn't that smart, there's a great improvement waiting to
>> happen.
>>
>> 2018-07-07 12:59 GMT+02:00 <[hidden email]>:
>>
>>> A quick anecdote...
>>>
>>> I and a lot of people on my team used to habitually halt() to exit.
>>>
>>> Then one day someone abruptly shut down a remote node they were connected
>>> to because, well, they had that habit.
>>>
>>> ^G is a safer habit to form and reminds you where you are at when you hit
>>> it, whether connected to a remote node from a local erl shell (want 'q'),
>>> or via SSH (want 'exit()').
>>>
>>> -Craig
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> erlang-questions mailing list
>>> [hidden email]
>>> http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions
>>>
>>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> erlang-questions mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions
>
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Re: erlang 21

Sam Overdorf
I'm running windows 7 professional.

It works fine with otp-20 and older versions (I still use 20.3) so
something has been changed..
if I run "erl +Bc" then control-c works just fine.
Is there a configuration file for :"erl" that I can add this flag to
to make it work the old way?
I use control-c all of the time.

Thanks,
Sam

On Sat, Jul 7, 2018 at 5:28 AM, Fred Youhanaie <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I'll just add to all the good advice so far that "erl +Bi" will disable
> Ctrl-C.
>
> That might be the source of Sam's issue.
>
> Cheers,
> Fred
>
>
> On 07/07/18 12:12, [hidden email] wrote:
>>
>> Those usability improvements have already been made:
>>
>>    ^G
>> Gets you to JCL mode. All Erlangers should be familiar with this. If
>> you're
>> not, then read up on it and play around. Not much to learn.
>>
>>    restricted shell
>> This is the real life saver: picking what commands are allowed to be run
>> by
>> a user. This gives you a LOT more flexibility and than merely making
>> things
>> like q() and exit() more special than they already are.
>>
>>    customized shell over SSH
>> Even more freedom than a restricted shell definition. You can write some
>> really awesome remote tools this way (or an entire MUD interface...).
>>
>> halt() and init:stop() are system calls and really shouldn't be the
>> subject
>> of any human's habit-forming behaviors.
>>
>> IMO this is a case of the humans ignoring the tools that have been made
>> available -- making similar things available under different names is not
>> likely to help.
>>
>> -Craig
>>
>>
>> On 2018年7月7日土曜日 13時03分04秒 JST you wrote:
>>>
>>> I would say there is a clear usability flaw here. The shell should be
>>> smart
>>> enough to distinguish which command was typed (^G, ^C or q() or exit() or
>>> init:stop() or halt()) and whether there is a remote shell active. What
>>> it
>>> would do is to ask user what is his intent or somehow confirm that remote
>>> shell is active and REMOTE VM will now quit.
>>>
>>> If the shell isn't that smart, there's a great improvement waiting to
>>> happen.
>>>
>>> 2018-07-07 12:59 GMT+02:00 <[hidden email]>:
>>>
>>>> A quick anecdote...
>>>>
>>>> I and a lot of people on my team used to habitually halt() to exit.
>>>>
>>>> Then one day someone abruptly shut down a remote node they were
>>>> connected
>>>> to because, well, they had that habit.
>>>>
>>>> ^G is a safer habit to form and reminds you where you are at when you
>>>> hit
>>>> it, whether connected to a remote node from a local erl shell (want
>>>> 'q'),
>>>> or via SSH (want 'exit()').
>>>>
>>>> -Craig
>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>> erlang-questions mailing list
>>>> [hidden email]
>>>> http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions
>>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> erlang-questions mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions
>>
> _______________________________________________
> erlang-questions mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions
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Re: erlang 21

Fred Youhanaie-2
I don't have windows installation, so can't comment on that side.

However, the man page for erl says:

        "Notice also that Ctrl-Break is used instead of Ctrl-C on Windows."

Does Ctrl-Break work for you?

Cheers,
Fred

On 07/07/18 22:18, Sam Overdorf wrote:

> I'm running windows 7 professional.
>
> It works fine with otp-20 and older versions (I still use 20.3) so
> something has been changed..
> if I run "erl +Bc" then control-c works just fine.
> Is there a configuration file for :"erl" that I can add this flag to
> to make it work the old way?
> I use control-c all of the time.
>
> Thanks,
> Sam
>
> On Sat, Jul 7, 2018 at 5:28 AM, Fred Youhanaie <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> I'll just add to all the good advice so far that "erl +Bi" will disable
>> Ctrl-C.
>>
>> That might be the source of Sam's issue.
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Fred
>>
>>
>> On 07/07/18 12:12, [hidden email] wrote:
>>>
>>> Those usability improvements have already been made:
>>>
>>>     ^G
>>> Gets you to JCL mode. All Erlangers should be familiar with this. If
>>> you're
>>> not, then read up on it and play around. Not much to learn.
>>>
>>>     restricted shell
>>> This is the real life saver: picking what commands are allowed to be run
>>> by
>>> a user. This gives you a LOT more flexibility and than merely making
>>> things
>>> like q() and exit() more special than they already are.
>>>
>>>     customized shell over SSH
>>> Even more freedom than a restricted shell definition. You can write some
>>> really awesome remote tools this way (or an entire MUD interface...).
>>>
>>> halt() and init:stop() are system calls and really shouldn't be the
>>> subject
>>> of any human's habit-forming behaviors.
>>>
>>> IMO this is a case of the humans ignoring the tools that have been made
>>> available -- making similar things available under different names is not
>>> likely to help.
>>>
>>> -Craig
>>>
>>>
>>> On 2018年7月7日土曜日 13時03分04秒 JST you wrote:
>>>>
>>>> I would say there is a clear usability flaw here. The shell should be
>>>> smart
>>>> enough to distinguish which command was typed (^G, ^C or q() or exit() or
>>>> init:stop() or halt()) and whether there is a remote shell active. What
>>>> it
>>>> would do is to ask user what is his intent or somehow confirm that remote
>>>> shell is active and REMOTE VM will now quit.
>>>>
>>>> If the shell isn't that smart, there's a great improvement waiting to
>>>> happen.
>>>>
>>>> 2018-07-07 12:59 GMT+02:00 <[hidden email]>:
>>>>
>>>>> A quick anecdote...
>>>>>
>>>>> I and a lot of people on my team used to habitually halt() to exit.
>>>>>
>>>>> Then one day someone abruptly shut down a remote node they were
>>>>> connected
>>>>> to because, well, they had that habit.
>>>>>
>>>>> ^G is a safer habit to form and reminds you where you are at when you
>>>>> hit
>>>>> it, whether connected to a remote node from a local erl shell (want
>>>>> 'q'),
>>>>> or via SSH (want 'exit()').
>>>>>
>>>>> -Craig
>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>> erlang-questions mailing list
>>>>> [hidden email]
>>>>> http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> erlang-questions mailing list
>>> [hidden email]
>>> http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions
>>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> erlang-questions mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions
> _______________________________________________
> erlang-questions mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions
>
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Re: erlang 21

Sam Overdorf
My laptop does not have the proverbial Break-key (not enough room for it).
I don't remember if the alt-ctl-b is the same thing.

If I knew  where the app-config-file is for erl I can change that to
get it working.

Thanks,
Sam


On Sun, Jul 8, 2018 at 5:47 AM, Fred Youhanaie <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I don't have windows installation, so can't comment on that side.
>
> However, the man page for erl says:
>
>         "Notice also that Ctrl-Break is used instead of Ctrl-C on Windows."
>
> Does Ctrl-Break work for you?
>
> Cheers,
> Fred
>
>
> On 07/07/18 22:18, Sam Overdorf wrote:
>>
>> I'm running windows 7 professional.
>>
>> It works fine with otp-20 and older versions (I still use 20.3) so
>> something has been changed..
>> if I run "erl +Bc" then control-c works just fine.
>> Is there a configuration file for :"erl" that I can add this flag to
>> to make it work the old way?
>> I use control-c all of the time.
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Sam
>>
>> On Sat, Jul 7, 2018 at 5:28 AM, Fred Youhanaie <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>> I'll just add to all the good advice so far that "erl +Bi" will disable
>>> Ctrl-C.
>>>
>>> That might be the source of Sam's issue.
>>>
>>> Cheers,
>>> Fred
>>>
>>>
>>> On 07/07/18 12:12, [hidden email] wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Those usability improvements have already been made:
>>>>
>>>>     ^G
>>>> Gets you to JCL mode. All Erlangers should be familiar with this. If
>>>> you're
>>>> not, then read up on it and play around. Not much to learn.
>>>>
>>>>     restricted shell
>>>> This is the real life saver: picking what commands are allowed to be run
>>>> by
>>>> a user. This gives you a LOT more flexibility and than merely making
>>>> things
>>>> like q() and exit() more special than they already are.
>>>>
>>>>     customized shell over SSH
>>>> Even more freedom than a restricted shell definition. You can write some
>>>> really awesome remote tools this way (or an entire MUD interface...).
>>>>
>>>> halt() and init:stop() are system calls and really shouldn't be the
>>>> subject
>>>> of any human's habit-forming behaviors.
>>>>
>>>> IMO this is a case of the humans ignoring the tools that have been made
>>>> available -- making similar things available under different names is
>>>> not
>>>> likely to help.
>>>>
>>>> -Craig
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On 2018年7月7日土曜日 13時03分04秒 JST you wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> I would say there is a clear usability flaw here. The shell should be
>>>>> smart
>>>>> enough to distinguish which command was typed (^G, ^C or q() or exit()
>>>>> or
>>>>> init:stop() or halt()) and whether there is a remote shell active. What
>>>>> it
>>>>> would do is to ask user what is his intent or somehow confirm that
>>>>> remote
>>>>> shell is active and REMOTE VM will now quit.
>>>>>
>>>>> If the shell isn't that smart, there's a great improvement waiting to
>>>>> happen.
>>>>>
>>>>> 2018-07-07 12:59 GMT+02:00 <[hidden email]>:
>>>>>
>>>>>> A quick anecdote...
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I and a lot of people on my team used to habitually halt() to exit.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Then one day someone abruptly shut down a remote node they were
>>>>>> connected
>>>>>> to because, well, they had that habit.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> ^G is a safer habit to form and reminds you where you are at when you
>>>>>> hit
>>>>>> it, whether connected to a remote node from a local erl shell (want
>>>>>> 'q'),
>>>>>> or via SSH (want 'exit()').
>>>>>>
>>>>>> -Craig
>>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>>> erlang-questions mailing list
>>>>>> [hidden email]
>>>>>> http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> _______________________________________________
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>>> _______________________________________________
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Re: erlang 21

Adam Lindberg-7
In reply to this post by Dmytro Lytovchenko
The proper solution here would be to support Ctrl+D as with most other interactive terminals out there:
https://bugs.erlang.org/browse/ERL-331

Cheers,
Adam

> On 7. Jul 2018, at 13:03, Dmytro Lytovchenko <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> I would say there is a clear usability flaw here. The shell should be smart enough to distinguish which command was typed (^G, ^C or q() or exit() or init:stop() or halt()) and whether there is a remote shell active. What it would do is to ask user what is his intent or somehow confirm that remote shell is active and REMOTE VM will now quit.
>
> If the shell isn't that smart, there's a great improvement waiting to happen.
>
> 2018-07-07 12:59 GMT+02:00 <[hidden email]>:
> A quick anecdote...
>
> I and a lot of people on my team used to habitually halt() to exit.
>
> Then one day someone abruptly shut down a remote node they were connected
> to because, well, they had that habit.
>
> ^G is a safer habit to form and reminds you where you are at when you hit
> it, whether connected to a remote node from a local erl shell (want 'q'),
> or via SSH (want 'exit()').
>
> -Craig
> _______________________________________________
> erlang-questions mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions
>
> _______________________________________________
> erlang-questions mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions

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Re: erlang 21

Lukas Larsson-8
In reply to this post by Sam Overdorf
Hello,

On Sat, Jul 7, 2018 at 1:48 AM Sam Overdorf <[hidden email]> wrote:
Control-c does not get me out of the "erl" command line any more.
Why not?


I was able to reproduce the same behaviour in my windows machine and found a bug in the new poll implementation that effects windows that makes it not react to break (ctrl-c or ctrl-break).

I'll put in a fix to be released in the next maintenance release. Thanks for reporting this issue.

Lukas
 

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